Monday, April 8, 2013

Les Misérables: G is for Gavroche


Whether or not you agree with a kid participating in a Revolution, you've got to agree that this little guy had "pluck". I wish more of our young men had the courage to stand up for what they believe! He reminds me of one of the Bible's heroes, King David, who led the children of Israel to victory in many battles.  He was also a musician, and wrote many songs.  Here is one:

Source

Psalm 56:11 In God have I put my trust: I will not be afraid what man can do unto me.


Although the Revolutionists did not gain the victory as they faced impossible odds, you must admit they were courageous...especially Gavroche!

There's one scene that touches me, but also leaves me with questions. The skirmish is over, all the lads have died in battle, and their bodies laid out on the floor of the café where they had, the day before, toasted to their friendship. A sad scene. But here comes Javert, surveying the bodies. When he comes to Gavroche, the Inspector does something surprisingly out of character. Javert removes a medal from his uniform, and pins it on the little guy's chest. So, my two questions are these: Why did Javert do this, and, what is the significance of the medal?

The more I ponder my own questions, the more I think it has to do with Gavroshe's undercover work. The lad has "street smarts" and connections. So he discovers that Javert is not who he says he is. He reveals to all that Javert is not an ally, but a spy...a traitor!

So, what do you think? What was going on in Javert's mind when he pinned the medal on Gavroche? Why this particular medal?


16 comments:

  1. I just watched the Les Miz movie yesterday (bawled loads!). I thought that Javert put a pin on Gavroche because of his courage and his innocent, unconditional belief in the cause. In many ways, Javert is a very idealistic man (hence why he got so obsessed with Jean Valjean) and morally, Gavroche was probably a hero in his books. But I also think that's the breaking point for Javert when he begins to see shades of grey in the whole us (government, law protectors) vs. them (revolutionaries, convicts) framework

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    1. It is a tear-jerker, Melch, but I'm glad you had a chance to watch it. What great observations you've make...they hit the mark! Thanks for stopping by!

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  2. Melch certainly has a complete answer to your question--a better one than I could have given.

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    1. Seems so, Lee, but there is always room for others. Thanks for stopping by...happy A to Z!

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  3. You're doing a Les Mis theme for the challenge? That's amazing. I love Gavroche. Total underrated character.

    Happy A through Z posting!
    http://pensuasion.blogspot.com/

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    1. I think you are absolutely right, S.L....thanks for stopping by!

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  4. I have the movie on my table waiting to be watched. First play I ever saw on Broadway. Such a great story! Looking forward to applying your questions when I watch it!

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    1. Great, PK, but be ready for a good cry! I have seen two movie versions and a play, and by far this latest film is the absolute best.

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  5. I've always liked the song Gavroche sings. When I first got the soundtrack I played that song over and over to get all the words. It took me a while. Some of them were hard to understand!

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    1. That's true, Joy...he sounds more like a Cockney accent from a London suburb, rather than a French accent. I rely on the libretto to decipher the words! Thanks for stopping by to comment..

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  6. It's been so many years since I saw the play, I don't remember.

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    1. If you get the chance, Alex, see the latest film of Les Mis...spectacular! Thanks for stopping by...

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  7. I think Javert recognized this boy's courage, bravery, and standing up for something he believed in. Maybe Javert wished he could've done that more instead of always following the law, his work, and what he had to do rather than what he wished to do. ?

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    1. Yes, I think you are exactly right, Tina. He admired things that he either wished he could do, and those he did do, like fighting for his cause . . . keeping the law. Good thoughts. Thanks for contributing!

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  8. The gift to the dead boy is the beginning of Javert's heart change. I watched the movie with the director's commentary, and he explained that Javert is beginning to feel sympathy for others...he is beginning to feel compassion, even though he thinks it's weakness. The mercy he has experienced repeatedly by ValJean is starting to penetrate him. It is initially felt when he realizes this young child has been killed. Sadly, the transformation of his heart makes him uncomfortable, and when he confront ValJean the next time...he realizes he can't live with a weak/compassionate heart and commits suicide.
    from The Dugout






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    1. Ohhhhh. . . good insights! We have that version of the DVD. I need to watch the directors comments...

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I would love to have you comment...thanks!

Journey into the Promised Land

Journey into the Promised Land
From Egypt to Israel